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~ Octave
~ Meep
~ MPB



Matlab vs Octave
Octave Intro
Toolbox Examples
Toolbox Download

calcBJTBiasBasic.m
calcCascadedNoise.m
calcMicrostripEL.m
calcMicrostripEre.m
calcMicrostripL.m
calcMicrostripMenu.m
calcMicrostripW.m
calcMicrostripZo.m
calcStabilityCircles.m
calcVSWRcircle.m
csv2mdf.m
db2r.m
dbm2watt.m
example1.m
example2.m
example3.m
example4.m
gamma2rl2vswr.m
gammaLoad2gammaIn.m
getFreqDistribution.m
getNextPlotStyle.m
getRandomColor.m
gtoz.m
importCsvColData.m
importCsvFolder.m
importS2P.m
listDir.m
loadMdf.m
materialProperties.m
plotStabilityCircles.m
ptor.m
r2db.m
rtop.m
saveMdf.m
scAddCircle.m
scAddLabels.m
scAddPoint.m
scCreate.m
singleFreqSparams.m
testStability.m
watt2dbm.m
ztog.m


Octave Intro

Here are a few concepts I hope will help get the new user started. If you feel an additional topic would be helpful, feel free to let me know.

The following website is the best reference I have found. This is where I learned almost everything I know about octave. The authors John W. Eaton, David Bateman, and Soren Hauberg have everything organized by topics, making it an easy and quick reference.



Ubuntu is the easiest version of linux to use. Octave will run on other Linux operating systems, along with Windows and Mac. I will focus on Ubuntu here, simply because it's easy and I use it personally.

Installation -

Open up the Ubuntu Software Center. It may have a different name depending on your version of Ubuntu. Search for octave and download the latest version. I currently have version 3.2, but there are more recent releases available.



Starting Octave -

Open up a terminal window, type octave, and hit enter. The prompt should have changed from user@computername:~$ to octave:1>. This is octave in interactive mode.



Interactive Mode -

Once you see the octave:1> prompt, you have a couple different options. You can just start typing math stuff and use octave as if it's just a sweet calculator. Alternatively, you can call function files or script files. Lets start by testing out our sweet calculator with the following commands.

octave:1> a = [1,2,3];
octave:2> b = 2;
octave:3> c = a*b
c =

   2   4   6


This example simply defines a vector, a scalar, and multiplies them together. The result is a matrix, c = [2,4,6]

Function Files -

A more flexible option would be to create a function file. A function file is simply a text file, with all the commands you want to execute placed inside a function. Here is the previous example executed using a function file. Start by creating a text file with the following and save it as example.m.

####################
# example.m
# multiply a and b
####################
function example()
a=[1,2,3];
b=2;
c=a*b
endfunction

The file must be saved with the same name as the function inside and the first uncommented line must be "function .......". Gedit is a nice text editor with a highlighting option for octave. Use your Unix commands (cd folder, cd .., and ls) to navigate to the example.m file you just created. Now simply type the function name as follows and hit enter.

octave:4> example

There you go. The same results as before should now be displayed. Now you can create an assortment of function files to perform different tasts. The toolbox found on this site is simply an assortment of function files to do different things. Keep in mind, a function file can use other function files that are in the same folder.

Help Files -

A help file is simply the commented text before the function. Try typing the following and hit enter.

octave:4> help example

####################
# example.m
# multiply a and b
####################

This is a standard for most octave commands. If you're ever curious what a function does or need more details on how to use it, look at its help file.

Alternative Terminal Options -

You will probably spend an excessive amount of time using the terminal from here on. For some additional functionality, try downloading Guake Terminal. Guake can be opened and closed quickly using F12, supports multiple tabs, and has a bunch of other fun hot keys. Another cool terminal is called byobu. Byobu can display all kinds of nifty info about your computer or a custom script. I haven't found a real good use for it, but it's still entertaining to watch the memory, processing power, and temperature change while running scripts.


Questions/comments:
CREATINGRF [at] GMAIL.COM